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Sandra Martyres, IN
 

 

 

 

Haiku

 

Rainbow Hopes

 

Scanning the dark skies
For a tiny patch of blue
And then a rainbow

 

 

Senryu

 

Heaven

 

Dancing on the clouds
To the music of angels
She tapped on heaven's door

 

 

Haiku

 

Rain

 

She twirled in the skies
Romancing the thunder clouds
And then came the rAiN.....

 

 

Rose Bud

 

A small red rose bud
Peeps out slowly through the bush
Just to feel the sun

 

 

Free Verse

 

...The Storm

 

Mesmerised I watch
From my window the
Storm approaching
From the Arabian Sea
A thick blanket heading
Towards the shore
Visibility is almost nil
As the howling winds
And heavy rain engulf
Nearby buildings and
Finally lash against my
Window panes causing
Eerie rattling sounds
The only sign of light
Comes from the streaks
Of lightning that criss-cross
The blue-black skies
At regular intervals
Accompanied by the
Loud drums of thunder
As they roll by causing
Turbulence in the
Atmosphere and raw
Fear among the people
Running down the streets
Helter skelter
Such is the terror
Created by a Storm

 

 

Collecting Raindrops

 

As the rain intensified
He moved under the shelter
Leaving his bowl on the street
When it was almost full
He carefully retrieved it
Not letting the water spill
A passer by looked in askance
And he replied in a soft voice
"If there is no dinner tonight
At least I will have my quota
Of fresh rain water to drink"

 

 

Pantoum*

 

Acting Dreams & A Glass of Wine

 

It all started with a glass of wine
They were in celebration mode
The heady red spirit was fine
But they had violated the code

They were in celebration mode
All set for fun they went on stage
But they had violated the code
They could not drink being underage

All set for fun they went on stage
To put up their bravest Act till date
They could not drink being underage
Not surprisingly they had a long wait

To put up their bravest Act till date
The Authorities had their spies around
Not surprisingly they had a long wait
With wine on their breath they were found

The Authorities had their spies around
Four young tipsy boys were led away
With wine on their breath they were found
All their acting dreams went astray

Four young tipsy boys were led away
The heady red spirit was fine
All their acting dreams went astray
It all started with a glass of wine

 

*Pantoum: In western poetry Pantoum is the word used for the Malayan pantun, a poetic form that first appeared in the 15th century in Malayan Literature (Padgett, 133), specifically, the pantun berkait, a series of interwoven quatrains. An English translation of  a pantun berkait appeared in William Marsden's A Dictionary and Grammar of the Malayan Language in 1812 (Wikipedia).

In English the pantoum has become a poem of indeterminate length.  It is composed of quatrains in which the second and fourth lines of each stanza serve as the first and third lines of the next stanza, continuing throughout the poem, until the last stanza, where the first line of the poem reappears as the last and, in some English pantoums, the third line of the first stanza becomes the second line of the last stanza (as above).  Thus, the pantoum begins and ends with the same line, and throughout the poem, the cross rhymes scissor the couplets, developing different themes concurrently, one theme in the first couplet and a second theme in the second couplet (Preminger). Ideally, the meaning of lines shifts when they are repeated although the words remain exactly the same: this can be done by shifting punctuation, punning, or simply recontextualizing (Wikipedia). The use of rhyme in Pantoum is optional (Padgett).

The Pantoun was introduced to the West by the French orientalist Ernest Fourinet and adopted by Victor Hugo. Other French writers who write pantoums include Théodore de Banville, Louise Siefert, Leconte de Lisle, Théophile Gautier and with considerable variation, Charles Baudelaire (Preminger).

In 19th century England the Pantoum was developed Austin Dobson in "The Town" and James Brander Matthews in "En Route" (Padget).

American poets such as John Ashbery, Some Trees (1956), Marilyn Hacker, Donald Justice, Carolyn Kizer, and David Trinidad have done work in the pantoum form. Neil Peart used the form for the lyrics of "The Larger Bowl (A Pantoum)" on Rush's 2007 album, Snakes & Arrows (Wikipedia).

Part of the pleasure of the pantoum is the way recurring lines hypnotically and gently flow in and out of each other sometimes surprising us when they unexpectedly fit together in revealing ways.

 

Resources

"Pantoum". The New Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics.  Alex Preminger and T. V. F. Brogan, editors. MJF Books: Princeton University Press. 1993. pp. 875-876.

"Pantoum". The Teachers & Writers Handbook of Poetic Forms, Ron Padgett, editor. New York: Teachers & Writers Collaborative, 1987, pp. 133-135.

"Pantoum". Wikipedia

 

Let Us Pray: Free Verse: The Power of Prayer

 

 

About Sandra Martyres, IN

 

Sandra Martyres - I live in Mumbai- India and work with a multinational bank. I hold a Masters in Economics and enjoy reading books on Management and Finance. In addition, I have other hobbies like music, reading novels, philately, theatre, travelling and poetry writing. While I have always had a fascination for writing poetry, I have only recently i.e. over the past four years been writing regularly. I am particularly interested in the Japanese poetry forms like haiku, senryu and tanka. I also enjoy writing narrative poems.

This is Sandra Martyres first appearance in Sketchbook.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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