foundpoetrystudio .  Poetrywriting Exercises

 

 



Exercise 2: Found Poem using any two sources selected by the author
 

 

Found Poetry Exercise 2

 

    Participants

 

   Neal Whitman    /NW

 

   Shanna Baldwin Moore    /SBM

 

   Linda Papanicolau    /LP

 

   Karina Klesko    /KK

Dragons at the Door: Haibun
Daylily - Following the Sun
Daylily - Following the Sun - White
Daylily - Following the Sun - Black         Sijo / Korean Song: Proverbs

   Bernard Gieske    /BG

Tribute To Jean Ritchie: Free Verse

   John Daleiden    /JD

The Interloper Journeys From Page to Page
A Night At The Opera: Incremental Line Increase

  Judith Gorgone    /JG

as big as life: Free Verse

   Craig Tigerman

Objects in Mirror are Closer than they Appear

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Karina Klesko: Exercise 2: Two sources in a Found Poem Sijo

 

Karina Klesko

Sijo / Korean Song: Proverbs

 

Pleasant words are as a honeycomb,
   sweet to the soul and health to the bones
Flowing from the lips
   upon ears of the wise in heart holding fast
A divine sentence
   is in the lips of the Lord


Source:  King James Revised: Proverbs 16:10,16:24

foundpoetrystudo Post Nos. 184, 185, 186
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/foundpoetrystudio/messages 

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Exercise 2: Two sources in a Found Poem

 

Sijo / Korean Song: Proverbs: Karina Klesko

 

The Task: Write a found Poem using any two or more sources selected by the author.

Be sure to identify your sources; for each source include title, author, publisher, and / or an on-line link if one is available.

Title your poem. 

Be sure to save a copy of your poem to your own computer; then post to the foundpoetrystudio.

Definition Material:

From Poets.org:

Found poems take existing texts and refashion them, reorder them, and present them as poems. The literary equivalent of a collage, found poetry is often made from newspaper articles, street signs, graffiti, speeches, letters, or even other poems.

and from Wikipedia:

Found poetry is a type of poetry created by taking words, phrases, and sometimes whole passages from other sources and re-framing them as poetry by making changes in spacing and/or lines (and consequently meaning), or by altering the text by additions and/or deletions. The resulting poem can be defined as either treated: changed in a profound and systematic manner; or untreated (verbatim): virtually unchanged from the order, syntax and meaning of the original.

Posting / Submission:

Post to the foundpoetrystudio at this link:  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/foundpoetrystudio/

  •  click post
  • select rich-text format
  • paste in your document or type in your document
  • format your document
  • PROOF READ YOUR DOCUMENT -- this is very important!
  • send your document
  • respond to feedback

List of Resources:

The Found Poetry Review: an on-line journal
http://www.foundpoetryreview.com/about

This quarterly on-line journal provides good definitions of "found poetry", examples, and a fair use standard.

They publish found poetry, centos, erasure poems and other forms that incorporate elements of existing texts.

Read Examples of Found Poems:

The Found Poetry Review: http://www.foundpoetryreview.com/fall-2011

Sketchbook: A Journal for Eastern and Western Short Forms:  Found Poem Contest